The War Against Japan – Canadian Autonomy during World War II

links:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_history_of_Canada_during_World_War_II 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declaration_of_war_by_Canada#Germany 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allies_of_World_War_II#Canada 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_War#Participants 

https://www.historyonthenet.com/why-did-japan-attack-pearl-harbor 

https://schoolworkhelper.net/japanese-invasion-of-malaya-singapore-history-and-significance/ 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Hong_Kong 

https://socratic.org/questions/why-did-japan-become-imperialistic 

https://www.historyonthenet.com/why-did-japan-attack-pearl-harbor 

https://socratic.org/questions/why-did-japan-want-to-take-over-china-and-other-places-in-asia 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_declaration_of_war_on_the_United_States_and_the_British_Empire 

DesmosPortraitMath10FPC20XX

For this project I decided to graph Doraemon, a Japanese children’s cartoon character, because of the simple design with bold lines. These distinct lines made it much easier to match the graphs to the image. Despite the seemingly perfect circles that make up most of his body, I used a variety of circle, quadratic, exponential, square, and linear equations to complete Doraemon in all his majestic glory. I was initially challenged by lining up the different graphs, but I developed a method that worked for me. I used the sliders to generally line the graphs up, then fiddled around with the equation until I was happy with the result. By doing this, I learned that most equations applied transformations similarly. For example, a vertical or horizontal stretch on both circle and quadratic graphs are applied by a coefficient on either the x or y variable. In conclusion, this project was quite enjoyable and I learned something, too.

https://www.desmos.com/calculator/ifelzvtkl4